Weekly Photo Challenge: Weightless

10 01 2016

The Northern Territory of Australia is home to many outstanding bird species.  The Whistling Kite is an amazing raptor often found circling overhead, seemingly weightless on the thermal current.  This shot was taken on the Adelaide River as the kites scouted for meat scraps left by feeding crocodiles.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Circle

8 01 2016

Weekly Photo Challenge: Circle

The Moongate is a circular opening in a garden wall and is a significant structure in a Chinese Garden.  This Moongate is part of the Chinese Garden at the Charles Darwin University in Darwin, the Northern Territory of Australia.

Circle

It’s great timing to start the New Year with a circle.  Chinese gardens were designed as sacred spaces where people could retreat, block out the daily grind and turn back to nature.  Spending time in nature is always a way I find my way back to me.  By stepping through a circle to enter, it reminds us of the circular nature of the universe, each thing and each one of us starting and ending, entering and leaving, leaving and returning and “coming full circle” through the circle of life.  Blessings to you for the year ahead.





Weekly Photo Challenge: In the Background

5 06 2013

Mindil Sunset Markets are a drawcard for visitors and residents across Darwin in the Northern Territory.  A vibrant  food market gathers under the coconut palms along the foreshore late on a Sunday afternoon during “The Dry” season.  People come for the atmosphere, a stroll through the crowd on a balmy evening, some fantastic food from a hawker’s stall and to watch the sun set over Mindil Beach.  Some have made it a tradition to meet, eat and sit for a while.  It’s a lovely spot and the beach is always busy with people enjoy the warm night.  We ventured down to the markets a few weeks ago and I love this photo I took of me snapping my friends snapping the sunset, in the background.

Mindil Beach Sunset; Darwin, NT.

Mindil Beach Sunset; Darwin, NT.

For more information about the Daily Post and the Weekly Photo Challenge – click HERE.





Weekly Photo Challenge: The Sign Says…

1 06 2013

Since moving a few thousand kilometres an into the Northern Territory of Australia, we’ve seen some new signs for unusual places and those alerting us to the company of wild creatures.  It’s quite interesting for a city kid… 🙂 Click on a picture for a bigger view and then scroll left or right through.

Check out more about the Daily Post and the Weekly Photo Challenge HERE.





Weekly Photo Challenge: Change

13 04 2013

After a Wet (monsoon) Season that has not been very wet, we’re now awaiting the change of seasons in the Northern Territory of Australia.  The Yolgnu indigenous people of East Arnhem Land recognise six distinct seasons in the “Top End” rather than the three seasons that us white fellas interpret  as The Wet, The Dry and The Build-up.  The Yolgnu live close to the land and know it intimately in a way we can only respect and struggle to understand.  To them, this period of ‘after-the-wet-and-not-quite-the-Dry” is known as the season of Mirdawarr when the winds change, floodwaters recede and the fish are plentiful.

I took an early morning drive out to East Point Reserve this week.  It is on the west coast near Darwin city.  After viewing the beautiful west coast sunset last month, I wanted to see the early morning, east light.  I wasn’t disappointed.  It was quiet and still, a warm gentle breeze made its way across the cliff face.  The delicate and cool east light crept towards the shore line.  And I was alone to enjoy it.

At the same time, the dragonflies were swarming.  Not just one or two, but swarms – dozens, possibly hundreds.  It was a spectacular and almost sacred sight.  They swarmed in and around me and a couple landed nearby on a woody shrub. These delicate creatures go through amazing changes in their lives from larvae to nymphs to intricate flying machines.  They tell us the Wet is over and the best is yet to come.   May it  be so.

Dragonfly dawn: the change of seasons in the Northern Territory.

Dragonfly dawn: the change of seasons in the Northern Territory.

For more on the Yolngu people, have a look at the videos made for, and by them at – 12 Canoes  It is a wake-up call to all Australians that this is a culture and heritage we have a responsibility to do whatever we can to help protect and preserve.  Catch up on the Weekly Photo Challenge by the Daily Post HERE.





Weekly Photo Challenge: Colour

8 04 2013

The Northern Territory of Australia is a vast slab of land.  As a rough guide it is twice the size of Texas, slightly bigger than South Africa and six times the size of the United Kingdom.  The landscape ranges from the arid Central desert region to the tropical “Top End”.  Since arriving in Darwin, the tropics have been in the monsoon season with more rain falling than I’ve seen in a lifetime.  With palm trees a-plenty, you can’t help but notice how lush, fresh and green everything is with the warm tropical rain.  Here is a collection of GREEN from my world.  Please note: none of these photos have been digitally enhanced or manipulated – they come straight from the camera, with a bit of cropping.

Find more about the Weekly Photo Challenge from WordPress and the Daily Post HERE.





Same place, different day

29 01 2013

I’m in a new space, literally and figuratively.  I have a new job in a different city, a new workplace and office and I’m making a new routine.  I take time out each day to step away from my desk, go outside and breathe in some fresh air.  It’s an important part of my day.

As a newcomer to the Territory, I marvel at my new surroundings even though blank faces stare back at me – over time the familiar has become invisible.  I decided to take a photo at the same time each day as a reminder that every day is precious and different and offers us a new beginning.

Here is a slideshow from my first fortnight at work – ten photos from the same spot at the same time each day (2pm).

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