Weekly Photo Challenge: Fleeting

26 07 2013

Urban art has a short lifespan and is only on show until the next person claims the wall.  Here is a fleeting glimpse of taggers at work in the now derelict powerstation in Coogee, Western Australia.  It’s an urban artist’s paradise.   Don’t ever believe these pictures are haphazard or purely opportunistic.  This guy had a small sketch book with him that he’d refer to occasionally as he marked out the scale and angles for his piece.

Creative mind at work

Creative mind at work

For more on the Daily Post and the Weekly Photo Challenge: CLICK HERE.

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Perth Alley Art – III

28 03 2012

I regularly walk through the Perth city centre and am especially drawn to the alleys and laneways that feature urban art. I’m not talking about the senseless tagging, obscene scribbles and outright vandalism on bins and bus shelters, I’m talking about art. Street art. I’m not advocating vandalism, I’m celebrating a medium and artist that is often misunderstood.

I love BIG art.  I love big, gutsy public art.  These pieces are really special to see.  I love to get up really close and let the whole picture consume my peripheral vision so I feel like I’m IN the picture.  I can check out the detail before pacing backwards with awkward strides to soak in the whole piece.  In – out, big – small, piece – whole, detail – entirety. I love it.

Unlike a gallery, there are no laminated signs saying “Please do not touch”. There are no fancy ropes keeping me from approaching and no security guards watching my movements.  I have complete freedom.  I like to stand close and see the textures on the surface, the shape and flow of the paint, the overspray, the layers, the runs, the stencil edge, the faux holes painted for effect, the shine and highlights on the brickwork or concrete.  Glorious.

Here are some more pics I’ve found lately around town.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I do – it certainly brightens up my lunchtime walk!

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Check out my other posts in this series:  Perth Alley Art – I  and Perth Alley Art II

 





Perth Alley Art – II

11 03 2012

If you missed Part I of this post – click here.

I’m still wandering the laneways and alleys in Perth city and collecting pieces of street art. There is a growing appreciation and recognition of “artists” of this genre which is fantastic because their work is extraordinary in size and scale. Some are now commissioned (when identified) to hold Exhibitions or work with youth on redeveloping Skate Parks and youth spaces.

Many urban and street artists have struggled for recognition, relegated to being misunderstood or labelled as ‘trouble’ or ‘vandals’. I love their work, their guts and passion. I love the fact they are so creative, innovative and driven to pour their souls out in public. Art is such a personal and vulnerable pursuit and they put it right out there for us all to see.
And judge.

It’s not in a private collection, foyer or gallery, but right out on the street. Genius.
Here are some more pieces I’ve found lately in Perth city.

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Perth Alley Art – I

7 03 2012

I regularly walk through the city centre and am especially drawn to the alleys and lanes that feature urban art. I’m not talking about the senseless tagging, obscene scribbles and outright vandalism on bins and bus shelters, I’m talking about art. Urban art. I’m not advocating vandalism, I’m celebrating a medium and artist that is often misunderstood.

The laneways in Perth are narrow and criss cross the streets and malls but unlike Melbourne, our laneways have not developed into a thriving micro-cafe culture. Perth’s alleys are still grubby delivery shafts featuring warped and rusted fire exits, rubbish bins, roller doors, and air conditioning vents. They’re off limits at night except to the souls who wander the streets but by day, they reveal an interesting contrast between beauty and dereliction.

I love it. I love the serendipity of finding a new piece. I love the scale and the detail. I love the subtext of the piece – it’s clever work. It thrills me more than lining up to see a travelling collection of Picasso’s at the Art Gallery. I love the transient nature of it, only surviving until city officials find it and cover it over with a messy paint job that only ever looks worse.

I love the fact it is hidden and has been created unseen. Designs have been patiently developed in note books and perfected in time, replicated over and over until every line is known by heart, saving time on the spot. Artists wait for the moment, the right time, the right place, the right wall, the right space before pouring out their soul onto the wall for some people to find. Here are some examples from the inner city alleys. Next week I hope to track down some work from Stormie Mills, it’s genius.

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The impossible possible

31 01 2012

Graffiti behind the bank - Beaufort St, Mt Lawley.

I started the River of Stones as a way of slowing down, capturing a moment, noticing and being thankful. In fact, I started this blog to capture my Small Stones each day. It has taken me to places I didn’t expect and has enabled me to move into experiencing life in a way I didn’t think possible. To those of you who’ve followed the journey, thank you for your encouragement and comments. Although the monthly ‘challenge’ is over, I intend to continue to write about random thoughts, emotions and observations.  Thanks for your company along the way.  : )





Mourning

10 01 2012

Looking in

December 15, 2011 marked the sudden and unexpected passing of my beloved mother-in-law, Beth.  

I can’t begin to express in words how broken I feel today but these pictures echo the cavernous hole left in me by Beth’s departure.  I’m raw, shattered, stripped and left wandering through the rubble inside me.  

I know it gets better, I know.  I know I’ll rebuild, I will.  But not today.

Through the floor








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